Permaculture

Students learning to lay out and plant a garden.
Moving chickens behind beef in a pasture is an example of permaculture practices with livestock.

Moving chickens behind beef in a pasture is an example of permaculture practices with livestock.

I’m working on the Permaculture and Soils course today.  Here are some thoughts from Penny Kriebel, who will be working with Mark to instruct the course:

 

Students learning to lay out and plant a garden.

Students learning to lay out and plant a garden.

 

“O’k Permaculture Design, Penny Krebiehl:

Taking a permaculture course can be very inspiring, and for me and many others awakens a whole load of creativity, positivity and eagerness to be a part of the solutions for our world. I took my first permaculture course in 2005, with several more to follow.  Why did I repeat a permaculture course? I wasn’t “held back” nor did I fail the course, I decided to continue my study and apprenticeship and because of the value of learning from many different teachers.  Each with a shared permaculture language, yet, like the Baker family with their experience in farming and animal husbandry, shared their own passionate understanding and skill set.

In 2009 I traveled out to NY state and completed an intensive and incredibly valuable Permaculture Teacher Training with,Dave Jacke, author of Edible Forest Gardens.  Since that time, I’ve also worked alongside of permaculture teachers, Peter Bane, author of Garden Farming for Town and Country, and Keith D. Johnson, who are also editor and co-editor of the Permaculture Activist Magazine.  I feel honored to continue my study and practice of permaculture with a plethora of experienced teachers and students and have only named a very few here, but definitely recognize and credit them with being amazing, inspiring mentors, and while feeling very, very grateful.

Through the years of adopting my own permaculture life-style practice and then starting to teach, I realized that permaculture was more than just gardening and it could be used to really transform our lives and transform our relationships and turn us all into happier, healthier people.  I’ve always planned my “career” and paid work around the needs of my family, and included my own children in the design of my working hours.  Since 1997, I’ve worked at and tweaked  a creative curriculum which has ultimately taught permaculture to children as young as age five, through college age.  I’m pleased to say that in teaching my most recent permaculture design course in North West Michigan in 2012, I was able to work alongside of a remarkable group of adults, upwards to 69 years old.

Much information about permaculture is available electronically, in books and published on the web.  But honestly, the most valuable learning experiences have happened when I’ve been immersed in a learning and sharing community that an on-site permaculture course offers.  The people part of learning permaculture in a class or workshop setting is a way to consciously mimic what happens in the natural world, and has proven over and over again to be an amazing adventure in knowledge-based skill sharing.

In permaculture design we try to turn around the limiting factors of a system, so if we’ve got something that’s limiting us it becomes one of the aspects we pay attention to in our design. This is where we ask – how can we use the permaculture principles and design in all areas of our lives?

Penny at Bakers Green Acres

I’m pleased to be invited as a part of the Anyone Can Farm teaching staff and share whatever I can of my passion and learning of Permaculture Design.

Penny Krebiehl

231-922-2014

penny.ok.art@gmail.com

www.pennyokart.com    “

 

Check out the class, which runs May 24-26.  Hope to see you here!

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