Bakers Green Acres

Your Pastured Poultry People

27
Jun
2016

How do we do it?  Here ya go.  And, always, your food is most secure when you can shake your farmer’s hand.

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24
Jun
2016

This week has been chicken processing week.  The first part of the week was spent harvesting our own birds.  Monday night is pickup time, after the birds are settled in for the night.  This eliminates a lot of stress on the birds and the humans as we don’t have to chase them down or crawl into the pen after them.  Tuesday and Wednesday are processing days, and everyone pitches in!  By Wednesday afternoon, all the whole chickens and cuts were in the freezer.  We prepared boneless, skinless breast, bone-in breast, thighs, drums, and more for the Flying Moose in Marquette, as well as whole chickens for various folks.  We still have some in the freezer for you, though!

Dorothy's packing chicken, but acting like a ham!

Dorothy’s packing chicken, but acting like a ham!

Friday is custom processing day.  Thursday evening folks bring their chickens to us.  Part of the process is signing the birds in and giving each group it’s own tag with any instructions on it. On Friday it’s all hands on deck again to get all the birds through the process, bagged, tagged, and ready to go out in the evening.  We had several folks that wanted their birds cut up, some vacuum packing.  It was also a variety day as we put several ducks and two turkeys through as well as the chickens.

The crew hard at it, more or less.

The crew hard at it, more or less.

The finale to the week: grilled pork chops and chicken drums (the bent and dents from the week)!  We may work like peasants, but we surely eat like kings.

 

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8
Jun
2016

Homegrown chicken

Even the animals proudly sport the new addition to our label.

Homegrown hog

Larry, one of our Mangalitsa boars, was happy to sport his “hero” label.  I suspect he thought he was the hero, because Larry’s like that.  If you were as fine looking as he is, you’d be entitled to whatever your opinion is, too.

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18
May
2016

“Thank-you for your service.”

It’s a statement veterans hear frequently.  They appreciate it, really.  A lot of them are trying to figure out how to make their experiences in the military jive with the challenges of civilian life.  One veteran said that being in a war zone is easier in a way: “All you have to do is stay alive.”  In civilian life, there are bosses and coworkers, family demands, bills, dreams with their challenges, a lot of goals and demands to satisfy as opposed to just one (stay alive).

Working with soil, plants, and animals is a fulfilling way to find a new spot in life, or just transition from one world to the other, for many veterans.  A better way than thanking a veteran with just words is to support his or her business.  The Farmer Veteran Coalition offers a Homegrown By Heroes label to help you identify products veterans produce.  Our products will proudly bear this label.  We encourage other veterans to put the label on their products.  We encourage the public to put action to word and support these veterans.

Buy AmericanBuy Local.  Buy Heroes.

 

Homegrown By Heroes

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25
Apr
2016

Life.  That’s what we’re about on this farm.  Part of our rebuilding process has been to seek ways to build into the lives of those around us.  Thus, we offer classes to help others raise their own food, provide healthful food for folks, and have sought ways to help a very needy population find ways to make their way in life.  Here’s a great article from The New American about that last effort:

Veteran-run Michigan Farm Opens Training Program for Returning Veterans

Contact us to find out how you can help, or to refer someone you think may benefit from joining our veteran community.

 

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